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Archive for the 'Astronomy' Category

Dieter Hartman

Hello all, we just had an amazing lecture by Gamma Ray specialist Dieter Hartman, here are some facts he enlightened us with. • Gamma rays help with magnitude of supernova such as brightness. • There is a large variety of gamma ray sources. • Sun has magnetic field on its surface same as Earth. • […]

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Questions for Dieter Hartmann

“Gamma-ray bursts come in two types – long and short. The physics are different depending on the system from which they originate.” You say GRB’s can be long and short. How long in duration is each type of burst? “In gamma-ray astronomy, the pictures aren’t very pretty – they’re not even meaningful unless you know […]

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Spectra

Today in class we learned about spectra and explored images of spectra. Spectrum is used to find the star age, galaxy distance and chemical composition . One cool fact I learned today is they make a bunch of little holes in the plates to observe the different kind of object in the space . It […]

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Redshift & Blueshift

Today I learned about Redshift & Blueshift. Apparently redshift is when a wave gets bigger as an object moves away and blueshift is when a wave gets smaller as an object gets closer.

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Plate 532

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Mirror Mirror on the Wall

Although difficult to understand because of typical Skype distortions and a British accent we are slightly less accustomed to, Nick Woolf was able to convey a wealth of information about his work building telescopes. More so than inspiring us with stories about superstructures already in existence, such as the Great Magellan Telescope featuring seven circular […]

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Telescope Plates

The plate on an aperture on a telescope. Each hole was drilled to look at an object whether a star or galaxy – Malek

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Plates that chart the night sky

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Nick Woolf

Hello all, here are some facts about the well celebrated astronomer Nick Woolf • Designed large telescopes all over the world using mirrors • Takes lots of time and money for space telescopes • Better to take advantage and learn ahead. • Think what is best question. Explain and research how you will approach. • […]

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Christianity and Astronomy

My whole life I’ve been a Christian. And it always vexed me how science classes have Christianity as playing a major role in people’s obstinacy that the world was flat or that everything revolved around the earth. Today, through Don York’s explanation, I learned that somewhere along history the church was highly influenced by Greek […]

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On telescopes and Nick Woolf

As one of my peers has been subjugated to us the “3,2,1” system, I figured might as well use it. 3 things that I learned: – When using telescopes, heat plays and important part on the quality of images you receive. – The Stratoscope II telescope was an improvement over the Stratoscope I because it […]

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3, 2, 1 . . . Lift-off!

Reading Nick Woolf’s lesson “Rockets to the Moon”, one gets inspired by his scientific drive and desire to make things better. When asked to summarize this 12-page lesson in five bullet points and a question, I was appalled. I wanted to fight back. In fact, my first thought was to write this posts as a […]

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SDSS Telescope

Today I learned about the design of a telescope, and that the SDSS telescope is relatively small compared to others. This is a diagram that Don York drew on the board and I copied in my notes of the SDSS telescope. I also learned that the way the of determining distances away a galaxy are […]

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The “Not-So-Basic” Telescope

This morning we were treated to a talk about his work on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey by Professor Don York. Starting out easy, the professor explained how a basic telescope works. He then told us how the SDSS collected its data. Put simply, it was very different from a “basic” telescope. It was an […]

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Don York

Today we just had an inspiring lecture by the University of Chicago’s very own Don York he talked to us about Sloan Digital Sky Survey “SDSS” in which he was the founding director. That’s all for now ill keep you all posted – Malek

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